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Los Angeles 2011-2012 cesarean rates

Cesarean birth rates

 

2011-2012  CESAREAN BIRTH RATES

(combined stats of National Vital Statistics Reports, Office of Statewide Health Planning & Dev.,

    www.cesareanrates.com/california-cesarean-rates)

 

UNITED STATES 32.8%  

CALIFORNIA 33%

 

Los Angeles Hospitals 2012    

I would estimate these to be within 1-3 % either side of accuracy, based on all sources

 

Cedars Sinai 37%

Glendale Adventist 38.5%

Good Samaritan  32.6%

Huntington Memorial 39.6%

Kaiser Sunset   32.9%

Kaiser WLA  32%

Kaiser Woodland Hills 27.8%

Little Co of Mary 35%

Providence Holy Cross 29.8%

Santa Monica UCLA 42%

St. Johns 38%

Tarzana Med Ctr  37%

Torrance Mem Med Ctr did not report CS

UCLA Ronald Reagan 33.5

Valley Presbyterian 40.4%

West Hills Med Ctr 41.3%

 

West LA Home Birth & Birth Center averages (from 12 local out-of-hospital birth practices):       5%

       

The World Health Organization and the National Institute of Health continue to state that there is no medical justification for a cesarean rate over 10%.   The best outcomes for mothers and babies appear to occur with cesarean section rates of 5-10%. Rates above 15% seem to do more harm than good. In addition, countries with the lowest perinatal mortality rates have cesarean section rates less than 10%. 

 

Cesarean-related surgical complications threatening the mother’s life or well-being include infection, hemorrhage, embolism, anesthesia problems, and injuries to other organs. Complication rates are estimated to be 5 to 10 times higher than of vaginal birth. Higher risks with each subsequent cesarean.  Research states that the cesarean maternal death rate is 40.9 per 100,000, four times higher than the vaginal birth mortality rate. Elective repeat cesareans have twice the maternal death rate.  (National Inst. of Health)

 

It is difficult to determine the death rate directly attributable to cesarean section (but not “related” to c-section) due to variations & complications leading to surgery. 

 

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